Posts Tagged ‘archaeology’

Magic Earth Lines 2: The 37th Parallel

The ranch was owned by a man named Howard Munsell (now deceased). Unlike a lot of Southern Plains ranchers who are, shall we say, standoffish toward strange visitors, he had previously run a trail-ride business, and so he was able to handle several dozen campers on his land, providing water and basic sanitary facilities. (After […]

Magic Earth Lines 1: “Discovering” Ley Lines

At Bad Archaeology, a skeptical look at Alfred Watkins and the “discovery” of ley lines: According to a later account, all this [discovery of a hidden web of straight lines in the English countryside] came to him “in a flash” on 21 June 1921 during a visit to Blackwardine; according to his son Allen, this […]

Starting 2015 with Giant Geoglyphs

Making large ceremonial marks on the land is an ancient practice. Here are examples from Peru, Chile, England, Brazil, Russia, the Arabian peninsula, and the United States

Solstice at Britain’s Newest Long Barrow

How will the archaeologists of the future explain how barrow (also known as as tumulus) building stopped in the Neolithic — and then resumed, 5,500 years later? We know this one was built on a solar alignment, because the BBC tells us so. See the barrow under construction here. And yes, dead people.

The Viking “Blood Eagle” Never Happened, Says Historian

A Swedish archaeologist reviews a new book, Anders Winroth’s The Age of the Vikings, and makes this observation: Myself, I was intrigued to learn that the infamous, messy and impractical “blood eagle” murder method may just be the fruit of High Medieval writers misunderstanding one of the countless references in Viking Period poetry to carrion birds […]

Egypt Has the Pyramids; Siberia has the Shigir Idol

Why the comparison between countless tons of quarried stone and “the oldest wooden statue in the world,” estimated at 9,500 years before present? In each case, there are those who believe that the structures (particularly the Great Pyramid) and the sculpture from the Ural Mountains contain secret codes. The tall statue is made from larch […]

Female Viking Warriors? A New Cinematic Arthur? And the Intern’s Tale

¶ Based on only six skeletons, some people are going crazy on Facebook, etc., about female Norse warriors. It’s not that simple, says someone who read the original archaeology paper. But it’s still interesting. ¶ Peg Aloi is a bit short of breath about a possible new film series on the Arthurian legend. ¶ What […]

Rethinking Bog People

In college I had a work-study job in the library, and my favorite part was shelving books, because I worked alone, deep in the stacks, and if I found something interesting, I could skim it quickly and either check it out or come back for it. One day I rolled my cart up to the […]

Around the Blogosphere, 17 July 2014

¶ Tanya Luhrman compares the cultural differences in “hearing voices” in the United States, Ghana, and India. Plus, a Dutch psychiatrist who encourages it in his patients! ¶ You have read Ethan Doyle White’s interview with Ronald Hutton, right? If not, here it is. ¶ Two from Sarah Veale at Invocatio: • A PhD dissertation […]

Caves, a Sacred Pillar, and a Mystery Disk

¶ If I could visit Chauvet Cave, I could die happy. It’s one of “10 must-see cave paintings,” of which I have seen none. At least I know where there is signage-free rock art in southern Colorado. ¶ Croatian Pagans erect a pillar to Perun, the sky god. With video, still photos, and music. ¶ […]