Evidence of Jesus’ Wife?

You don’t think a good Jewish boy from a peasant culture got to be thirty years old without being married, do you?

Now there is textual evidence that suggests that he was.

“This fragment suggests that some early Christians had a tradition that Jesus was married,” Dr. [Karen] King said. “There was, we already know, a controversy in the second century over whether Jesus was married, caught up with a debate about whether Christians should marry and have sex.”

Was or was it not Mary Magdalene, that is the question. Or was she just a well-off woman who helped to finance the ministry, as so often happens? Or as the Gnostic gospels suggest, one of the disciples — maybe one with special privileges — which brings us back to the question of her possible spousal status. Or were there two Marys — Magdalene the patroness and Mary the wife?

4 Comments

  1. Disciples With Privileges! Nicely done.

  2. Mira says:

    There’s the story of the wedding at Cana where Jesus’ mum after complaining to him that they’ve run out of wine orders the servants about – I have always thought this to be strange unless it actually was her son’s wedding.

  3. Pitch313 says:

    Reports of the little manuscript fragment made me chuckle, because I like to think that Jesus did marry Mary Magdalene. I hesitate a little on the fathered the royalty of Europe with Her thingy.

    But, what we may have here is a sort of proto Holy Blood Holy Grail. Not a wedding license. Speculation, not civic record.

    Honestly, what irked me most as I read about this fragment was the more or less unruffled way that scholars and academics accept that dealers and collectors routinely dismember ancient documents to ensure greater personal profits.

    Lastly, we shouldn’t rule out the notion that Jesus may have had not one wife but several wives. Either one after another or at the same time. At least as we speculate about the ancient speculators.

  4. Rummah says:

    Eh. This is old news to anyone who has waded through the translations of the Nag Hammadi find. So what the hell does “Thunder Perfect Mind” tell us?